Jason Yu MD
Dr. Jason Yu, MD: Interventional Pain Management

Headaches

We’ve all heard of Botox, responsible for generations of smooth foreheads in Hollywood. But Botox has also brought relief to many people who suffer from chronic medical conditions. In 2010, Botox was approved for use with chronic migraine, and many patients are reporting success. What do you need to know before considering it?

What Type of Headache Responds Best to Botox?

Botox is only FDA-approved for chronic migraines, which means a headache on 15 or more days a month.  The more frequent the headaches, the better the patient does with Botox. Botox is not recommended for patients who experience fewer than 15 headache days a month.

What is Botox?

Botox is a form of botulinum toxin, a neurotoxin produced by the bacteria that causes botulism. When the Botox botulinum toxin is purified and used in tiny doses in specific areas, it temporarily reduces muscle contractions for approximately 3 months.

How Does Botox Work?

Botox is injected around pain fibers that are involved in headaches. Botox enters the nerve endings around where it is injected and blocks the release of chemicals involved in pain transmission. This prevents the activation of pain networks in the brain.

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